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Does class affect our perception of the comic image? If so, how?

For the most part, I think that class does have a major affect on our perception of comics. Most of the popular comics either start off with an already upper class superhero just trying to better the world or it has a beginning story of the superhero coming from a lower or middle class background to a more upper class status. A main example of this, of course, is Superman. Superman starts off with an orphan boy adopted by a couple who lives on a farm in Kansas. The couple is not very wealthy but are more middle class citizens. Then when Superman grows up, he moves to the big city and to most people, cities generally mean more money and more upper class status. At the time Superman first came out, it was this part of the story that attracted most readers. The whole idea of a person coming from a low class society and moving to the city and really making a difference in the world is what most middle class people in America wanted. It was a version of the American dream. Then there is Batman who was a completely different story. Bruce Wayne was already a multi-millionaire business man. Being a dark, shadowy superhero made him popular but as Bruce Wayne, he was already a very influential man in society. I think it was the glamour of his life that also grabbed reader’s attention along with his gadgets and cool suit. The fact that he was wealthy and powerful but he used his power to stop crime and do good in society reflected on readers desire to become a part of the upper class citizens but to also make a difference in the world. Iron Man is also a great example of an upper class business man who discovered a more fulfilling way to use his money to make a difference in society. His vast knowledge on military weapons and his power in society helped him create a superhero that is extremely popular today. Both Batman and Iron man also had something that Superman didn’t. They were real men. Superman is an alien from outer space with supernatural abilities but Batman and Iron man are real citizens who became superheroes. That gives Americans even more hope to become something great in their lives. I also think this is the reason these comics are popular among upper-class individuals as well. Though, Superman also made a huge impact because of the fact that he start off low class and then became more middle-upper class. It is possible that it is this fact that made him more popular than both Batman and Iron man. However, it is clear that class has a great impact on our perception of comics. It helps us relate to the characters in some way whether we are lower, middle or upper class citizens.

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