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Arrogant sexist superman, defeats boring sexist villains.

I found the superman comic to be much different that I had originally thought of it. The Superman conveyed in the movies or the one I had always pictured was much more polite than the original Superman, who seems to be a bit arrogant.  An instant of his arrogance is perfectly depicted when he carries the governors assistant up the stairs to the governor because the assistant will not take him to the governor.  Superman therefore picks up the assistant and carries him to the bedroom of the governor.  Superman apparently does not take NO for an answer.  This idea becomes even more interesting when comparing Superman to his other self, of Clark Kent, who has no guts and is a pushover.  

I also noticed that the story-line seemed to change quiet a bit throughout the comic, there did not seem to be one main villain or evil plan that Superman must stop; instead there seems to be a series of different small events and stories within the one comic book.  There is the plot of Superman going to the jail and simply being told by a prisoner that he is innocent and that a certain woman is the actual murderer.  I thought this whole idea was a bit bogus, I mean there was no evidence that this woman committed the crime, until she blurted it out and tried to attack Superman.  Haha she had no idea what she had coming.  Then there is the lobbyist doing insider work, which has no relation to the other stories in this comic edition.  Also there is the issue of domestic violence that Superman takes care of.  While the abuser is doing wrong, he is not exactly an exciting villain. There does not seem to be any competition for Superman, no great villain who he must truly struggle against.  Where have all the cool villains gone? In another small plot, the man who demands Lois dance with him,  kidnaps her, only to be visited soon after by Superman, who has come to rescue the prisoner.  

Which brings me to another point;  the women in comics are portrayed in a sexist manner.  Lois apparently cannot take care of herself as well as she thought she could, and needs a man to rescue her as did  the woman whose husband was beating her.  "You're not fighting a woman , now", Superman exclaims as he punches the abusive husband, stating that women are easier to fight than a man, or a "Superman".  The women are also referred to in a derogatory manner, "I'll show that skirt she can't make a fool of Butch Matson!" The word skirt is quiet derogatory, as it is stating that a woman is a mere thing, a piece of clothing.  I think this is awful, but considering the person saying it is a villain, who is automatically associated with wrong doings, it makes it less offensive.  However if a non villain, such as Superman or another good super-hero had used that word to refer to a woman I promise that while it might not have been an issue then, it would definitely be one now.  

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